Tag Archives: gelato

Red Currant Ice Cream

perfect, gorgeous, homemade ice cream

Every year around this time our red currant plant starts yielding absurd quantities of fruit—or at least too much for two people to keep up with. In the past week I’ve given away a couple bags full and have frozen about a kilo. I’m not really into marmalade (both the process of making it and the texture annoy me), which leaves few options for how to make use of the copious amounts of berries currently all about the place. It turns out the hens don’t really like them, by the by.

Last year I made a refreshing (if a bit sour) and gorgeous-to-behold red currant sorbet. I’d started making my own sorbet a couple years back, after having purchased and been disappointed by one too many sickeningly sweet store-brought varieties, invariably full of glucose syrup—fine, technically it’s just sugar, I realize—plus the ubiquitous corn syrup, thickeners, stabilizers, colorings, and so on. With homemade sorbet you can pretty much achieve a ‘natural’ dessert and you control the sweetness level, something I find appealing. It’s much more economical. It’s easy. And there’s really no limit to the kinds you can make. So while contemplating a large bowl of currants, I thought about going with that recipe again. Then I remembered I had a carton of cream in the fridge! And minutes later I was busy making this ice cream. I hate to brag (really I do), but at times it’s just unavoidable—this ice cream is knock-your-socks-off good.

Ingredients

1 & 1/2 cups (about 250-270 grams) of fresh red currants
1 cup (225 grams) sugar
1/3 cup (about 80 mls) water
2 cups heavy cream (I used a 500-ml carton)

Instructions

Rinse the berries and remove all the little stems. Process the fruit until you have a thick, fairly uniform liquid, then strain once in a small-hole colander and then again in a mesh one. You won’t keep every tiny seed out; it’s okay, nothing to go all OCD about. The seeds are sort of cute (and besides, this is homemade ice cream). Set the juice aside. In a small saucepan over low heat, dissolve the sugar in the water, stirring constantly until you have a thick syrup. You don’t have to bring it to a boil. Let cool and then add the syrup to the fruit blend and combine well in a bowl. At this point, definitely test the sweetness. Currants are sour. I liked the sweetness achieved with this amount of sugar, but you could sweeten further if you wish. Place the bowl in the freezer for a few minutes while you whip the cream until very thick and pillowy. Gently fold the cream into the fruit mixture, then transfer to a sealable container and freeze. After about two hours the consistency is like a soft-serve ice cream. Freeze for another two hours if you want a more traditional ice cream consistency. Since this ice cream contains no fake-texture-preserving junk, it will freeze completely solid, so on successive days be sure to take it out of the freezer about 15-20 minutes before serving and stir it up a bit.

Ribes rubrum

Ribes rubrum

Gelato For A Muse

a cup of la musa, the gelato inspired by Maria Musa's beloved cake

a cup of la musa, the gelato inspired by Maria Musa’s beloved cake

During a special visit to Gelateria La Musa in Orvieto as a participant in the This is your time Travel Blog Tour, I was reminded of one of the things I love most about Italians— call it flair, or an ability to craft-create-design with an impeccable eye towards quality and authenticity. Especially when it comes to culinary matters, Italians seem to possess a kind of innate radar for what constitutes the real deal.

At the heart of this family-run enterprise is Chiara, a young Italian woman who brings together tradition, skill, and scrupulous standards in selecting raw materials for her gelato. Chiara studied Art History at university, yet she was so inspired by her uncle’s dream of making gelato, she chose to learn the craft rather than pursue a career in her field of study. Along with her bright smile and contagious enthusiasm, Chiara exudes a rare confidence for one so young, no doubt a result of her hard-won expertise.

Many of the gelato creations at Gelateria La Musa are inspired by traditional Italian desserts. One in particular is remarkable for both its backstory and pure yumminess. A cake made by Chiara’s grandmother, Maria Musa, is remembered fondly by the family and has become the basis for the  ‘house’ gelato, aptly named ‘la musa‘. It’s a flavor as whimsical as it is delightful, carefully crafted to recreate the harmonious flavor combination of nonna Maria’s beloved cake. Made with a blend of sheep and cow milk ricotta, Sambuca, cinnamon, and dark chocolate, gelato la musa is a taste experience indeed worthy of its name. If you find yourself in Orvieto, make time for a stop at this truly special gelateria, and be sure to ask for ‘the muse’.  

Chiara (right) with her mother, Elisa

Chiara (right) with her mother, Elisa